Mixergy dinner with the co-founder of Pixar

Sorry. No spots left.

This Friday, I’m having dinner with Alvy Ray Smith, co-founder of Pixar, and I’m inviting a few Mixergy upstarts to join us.

Since Alvy is an incredibly successful and popular founder, I know I could get a lot of people to come to this dinner, but I’d like to try to get a SMALL group of the RIGHT people instead. I think the conversation will be more meaningful if everyone you meet there knows Pixar’s inspiring story from idea in a garage to industry-changing film studio.

So, if you’d like to join us, tell me a little about yourself below. And if you haven’t caught his interview yet, go grab it now, even if you can’t make it to the dinner.

  • http://www.nastyclamps.com/ Mister Nasty Clamps

    Andrew: Alvy is an absolutely fascinating person, and someone who can talked about a wide range of subjects. More than a decade back, I met him at a small lil’ software company located just outside of Seattle, and –– to this day –– I tell people about the conversation, his insight regarding 3D graphics, and his thoughts about a small lil’ computer company located in Cupertino.

    I’d love to join you for the dinner. Sadly, I’ll be watching the rain come down in Portland.

  • http://mixergy.com Andrew Warner

    I was so disappointed when I read the last sentence of your comment. I wish you could come, but thanks for the comment.

  • http://www.smartbusinessrevolution.com/ John Corcoran

    I’m so disappointed I didn’t hear about this until now! Years ago, long before I went to law school, I actually studied to be an animator. In high school, I even worked at an animation art gallery in LA for a summer helping them to open and get established. Later, after college, I worked at the fledgling Dreamworks Animation Studios’ campus in Glendale, which was an awesome place to work with a lot of wonderfully creative people. Hope you have a great dinner!

  • http://mixergy.com Andrew Warner

    I feel bad about all the people I had to turn down for this event because of lack of space. Maybe in the future we can do a post-dinner drinks. I would have liked to have seen you.

  • Geoffrey Barrows

    Wow I would have actually flown out to SF for this!
    My work is effectively the reverse of Alvy’s- rendering is basically taking abstract geometric objects and turning them into pictures, while I am in machine vision for robotics where we took sequences of images and turn them into abstract perceptions.
    What I found most interesting from his interview was his response to Moore’s Law being too far behind- basically wait it out until computers inevitably got faster. I took a different tact- we design specialized camera chips that included both pixel circuits and analog (yup!) circuits to do initial processing. Technologically we had a few nice successes- in 2003 one of our “smart cameras” weighed just 4 grams and processed at 1400 frames per second using an 8-bit microcontroller running at 10MHz, and a toy airplane could use several of these to do things like turn away before crashing into trees etc. Businesswise though this wasn’t a success. Ten years later, Moore’s Law is finally catching up to the point though you can begin to get similar performance with “regular” components.
    The concept of surfing Moore’s law is fascinating- it is very much the case that computers are getting faster at a rate that exceeds our imagination’s ability to really exploit this increase.

  • http://mixergy.com Andrew Warner

    It would have been worth the flight. The conversation was great and I think what you’re working on would have been fascinating to him.

 
Mixergy loves you